SimworX Pro GT V3 LC Pedal Review

I like it when a Sim hardware company takes a different approach to designing a Sim Racing pedal set than most other manufacturers. Using pneumatic cylinders for a dampening feature is something I have not seen in the SRG for a long time. While using air compression as a damping solution, is not a new concept. I think it fits this application quite well. I believe that the guys at Simworx have done a good job at tuning these pneumatic cylinders for the job at hand. The result is a smooth repeatable feel  in the pedals stroke. When using the throttle pedal, I found it easy
to modulate the stroke here. Providing enough sensitivity to be as accurate as I need to be. While I found there was plenty of travel range for me on the throttle, some may want more. The brake pedal provides a lot of adjustment range to satisfy most I think. Once I was familiar with how the pedal adjustments worked, I had no issues dialing it in to my liking. And with a maximum of 140kg of pressure available, again I think most will be able to get the brake feel like they want. The clutch pedal was able to provide a feeling of pushing through the resistance of the pressure plate spring and lifting the plate from the clutches surface. It does have one of the shortest travel ranges of others that I have tested. I wasn’t sure how this would affect heel and toe work when driving. But was pleasantly surprised at just how well the short travel lent itself to this technique. I was up and running using heel in toe in no time at all. Happily stabbing away at the clutch pedal and never missing a shift because of anything it was doing. I actually became quite found of the clutch pedals action and travel. Now the overall quality of this Pro series set is very high. Consisting of 3mm thick powder coated steel plate in all the right places throughout its construction. And joining everything together with very good looking welds. When you have
this set in hand, it looks like it will be able to withstand a lot of punishment for a long time. This is the first pedal set I have had in the SRG that used the Linear magnetic position sensors. Contactless sensors should ensure a long life cycle here. Not only did they function without issue though out my rather aggressive testing, they also lend themselves well to the overall look
of the pedal set I think. Now this pedal set comes in at 1025.00 shipped to the USA from Austrailia. So, you will want to consider that when going over your options when looking for a pedal set
to meet all of your Sim racing requirements. Overall I consider this set to be a top tier unit. That will hold its own against other top sets available to the serious Sim Racer.

Read more

SHH “NEWT” H-Pattern/Sequential Shifter Review

The main casing on this unit is made from 3D printed ABS filament. Which is known for its toughness and durability. I did try to flex the case from the sides and only found one area where I could produce a very small amount of movement. But not enough to cause any problem for the internal parts. I thought the way this shifters internal mechanism works is quite clever. Pushing
down the shifter lever and rotating it 90° is all it takes to go from H pattern mode to Sequential mode. Using roller bearings to ride in the Derlin shifting ramps gives a smooth action to all of your shifts. With the notches in between providing a feel of actually engaging a gear. Of course, this action is much lighter than what you would find in a real gear box. Another plus here
is that there is no contact with the magnetic sensing electronics when making a shift. This does away with a wear point that other shifters may have. I also like the way the PCB boards that
contain the sensors are mounted with a spring suspension feature. Which will provide for better long term durability. Also of note here is the attention to the detail on this shifter. Little things like adding an additional internal plate to the design for protecting the cabling that runs the length of the shifters case. When driving the SHH I found it easy to come up to speed and produce accurate shifts. The shift lever moved smoothly between the gates. Allowing quick up and down shift combinations. I was wanting for more resistance to the shifting force. But I do think its
force, at the maximum setting, is in line with other shifters at this price point. I also ran the SHH in sequential mode. Here again, this unit did the job of letting you know you had made a shift. Nothing special here. It just gets the job done. Mounting the shifter to aluminum profile was quite easy and I was able to get as solid a mount as an ABS cased shifter can get I think. Still
as expected there is movement in the shifter case when driven aggressively. But not enough to ruin the experience. The SHH also comes with enough extras in the kit, like shifter gates and knobs, to give you good sense of value to the package. And you can get it in four different colors. With custom features available for additional cost. The mount you choose will also be extra.
But at the end of it all I think most will be happy with what they get in the SHH shifter.

Read more

Heusinkveld Sim Pedals Sprint Review

I have been looking forward to reviewing this kit for some time now. Finally, thanks to a fellow Sim Racer I know, I am able to put them through the SRG’s review process. This set
has some notable differences from the Pro pedals set that the Sprints are replacing. Where there was stainless steel plates used throughout the pedals now we have some powder
coated steel plates mixed in. I noticed that now there are nuts securing one side of the frames where before there were cap bolts on both sides of the frames. Overall the
build quality is up to the usual standards we have previously seen from Huesinkveld. Which is very good. The throttle was easy to dial in and has a lot of range in it’s
adjustability. I had no problem getting it dialed in to my personal preference. The brake is similar to Pro brake but with some changes to how the bumper stack is arranged.
Now including a spring to simulate the initial slack that most every brake pedal has. I tried every rubber bumper setup to see which I preferred. I ended up with the
thinnest one mounted. Of course the brake performs very well and it is easy to be consistent with your lap times with such a predictable brake feel. The clutch mechanisms the
biggest change from the Pro’s setup. It has a completely different look to it. I was able to dial it in to get a close feeling that I was using a real clutch. I was able to easily use a heel and toe
technique when I had the pedals set up for it. That is the best test for a pedal set I think. The pedal base that HE sells for the Sprint pedals did it’s job well as far as providing
a rather solid way to mount you pedals and have place to rest your heels. But, as you may seen in video, I think mounting the platform could be made a much easier task than it is
as configured. The U channel rails that support the mount and heel plates needs to be a bit wider to allow access to the screws with an Allen wrench. I was bit surprised to see
the solution to this access issue to be a set of hex head 5mm bolts. They actually turned out to be too long for use with 40 series profiles and the included roll in spring ball T nuts.
Just not the usual top notch solution I am used to seeing from the Huesinkveld team. Overall the Sprint set is well built, using strong materials, and top notch parts. Even though a lot has
changed between the old Pro pedals and new sprints. One thing hasn’t changed. They are still a great performing set of pedals that are a lot of fun to use.

Read more

Turn Racing R20 Wheel Review

It’s good to see that Zack is paying attention to user feedback on his wheels. And implementing changes where he thinks they will do the most in improving the user experience. This is
quite evident in the R20’s result. Now using a 5mm thick aluminum plate for the wheels center section. It has added a stiffer feel when in use over the previous R1 wheel. Which uses a 4mm thick plate. And as you may already know by watching my videos, the SRG is always looking for Sim racing hardware with the lease amount of flex possible. The bottom wheel spoke is a bit longer, and the side spokes have new thinner profile. These changes allow more room in the wheel for larger button plate designs. I was able to fit both the medium and
large sized Ascher Racing button plates into this wheel. With the R1 I was only able to fit the medium sized button plate. Having more options for button plate selection is always a good thing. The grips on the R20 are just a bit smaller in diameter than the R1. It is noticeable when switching back and forth between the two wheels. I could go either way here. So, this change does not have very much impact on the overall feel between them. Of course how a wheels grip feels couldn’t be much more subjective I think. And the only way to know if you
will like the way a grip feels is to try it yourself. The suede leather wrap on the R20 is well done. And all of this is done by hand on each wheel produced. Which is no easy task. If you have ever tried to do this yourself you know what I mean here. I have no problems with fatigue or cramps in my hands when using the R20 to race. Even on longer stints. I am torn a bit here between the R1 an R20. But I think the thicker aluminum used on the R20’s center section may be the deciding factor for me personally.

Read more

Hybrid Racing Simulations Xero-Play QR Review

When it comes to using Direct Drive wheel systems, a solid connection between your steering wheel and the motors shaft is essential to realizing the full potential of the
Force feedback queues you DD system is capable of delivering. Now you could just bolt your wheel directly to the hub adapter on the motor shaft and that would be fine. But, if you use more than one racing wheel. Then a Quick release system is something that will make your Sim racing life a lot easier. We still want that solid connection
between the wheel and wheelbase. Previously the only quick release system I would recommend was the Q1R kit. But now we have the Xero-Play QR kit and it is every bit
as good as the Q1R. Constructed from 6061 aluminum, and stainless steel, it has a light weight yet very solid feel to it. And once clamped down, I was never able to detect
any movement or flex in the mating surfaces. I’m sure this result is due to the way the bottom of the mechanism presses the triangle mating surfaces together. And because of the tight tolerances used in their manufacturing processes, I did not have to make any adjustments to the clamp when changing between different wheel side adapters. At
least for the three that I have here. Something that has been a sore point for me and others when using the Q1R wheel side adapters. Where tolerances are not as tight. The Xero-Play has a nice finish on every aspect of the pieces used here. Which gives it a very nice professional appearance. But I would like to see the points on either side
of the top clamp plate rounded off a bit more to relieve the sharp feeling they have when releasing the clamp during wheel changes. It doesn’t affect the performance
of this system, I’m just making and ergonomic observation on the kit I have. Overall the Xero-Play Quick release is impressive in how solid of a connection it has. So much so that now I now have two quick release kits I will recommend when it comes to choosing a Quick Release system for Direct Drive Force feedback wheelbases. Giving
the Xero-Play the nod between them for what seems to be tighter manufacturing tolerances on their respective mating surfaces.

Read more

Frex H Shifter+ Review

I’ve had my eye on this shifter for a few years now. And finally thanks to a fellow Sim Racer who was kind enough to send me his we can put it through the SRG’s review
process. According to the Frex website. This shifter is modeled after the one in a Porsche 962C race car. It has a short throw that reminds me of my old 2001 Honda S2000 shifter. It also has a very nice engagement when pushed into the selected gate. Creating a satisfying tactile click. It does not take much effort to make shifts here. And you do have some tuning capability using the shifters frictio adjustment screw to dial in your own preferred resistance. Due to it’s all metal construction, the body of this unit has a nice solid feel to it. I think Frex made some good choices here as to where to use aluminum and where to use stainless steel. With the stainless steel bits located at key
wear areas encountered when making shifts. Frex also paid attention to the details when designing this shifter. Things like the curved ramps milled into the shifters stainless
steel gate plate. Which helps give the shifter it’s smooth feeling action. In the look inside segment we saw what looks to be parts that should be easily replaced if the need should arise. I like the way the momentary buttons are used to signal shifts. Again a part that would not be difficult to replace. After using this shifter for a few days, I have become rather found of it. Now there is irregular spacing between the gates here. With the distance between gates one and two further away from gates three and four than five and six are. But not anything to really hinder shifts once your muscle memory has properly adapted to it. The side to side travel between the gates is more than most I have used. Still smooth and precise gate engagement makes you forget it’s there. But nothing is perfect and the one area I would like to see an improvement would be the available options for mounting it. Now don’t get me wrong, the front mount here does do its job. But I think having an optional plate that you could mount to the bottom allowing attachment holes down the side would improve the overall performance and feel of this shifter. Overall, I think the 460.00 price tag for this shifter is justified in the
build quality and performance that we have seen in this review. And I would feel confident in saying this is the second best H-pattern shifter that has been through the SRG’s
review process to date.

Read more

SimWorX Pro Series GT V3 LC Pedal Set Review By The SRG

SimWorX Pro Series GT V3 LC Pedal Set Review By The SRG

Barry Rowland from the Sim Racing Garage presents his detailed review of the SimWorx Pro Series GT V3 LC Pedal Set USB for the racing professional and sim racing enthusiast.

The Pro Series range of controls are products that were designed and developed by the Australian SimworX company with the ultimate aim of supplying the most realistic motorsport-inspired controls for the ultimate virtual racing experience.

Read more

Heusinkveld ADAC Sim Racing Expo Vlog #1

Heusinkveld ADAC Sim Racing Expo Vlog #1

As in previous years, Heusinkveld Engineering will be attending the yearly ADAC Sim Racing Expo, at the Nürburgring in Germany held from Friday 30.08.2019 until Sunday 01.09.2019.

During the event, various exhibitors will showcase their latest Sim Racing related products and in most cases give you the opportunity to perform a hand-on test.

Read more

Introducing the Gran Turismo Sport August Update

Introducing the Gran Turismo Sport August Update

By the time you read this, Polyphony Digital will have started rolling out the latest update for Gran Turismo Sport.

Update V1.43 will bring the fans 5 new Japanese sports cars, 7 new GT League rounds, and Wet conditions are added to the ‘Red Bull Ring’ and ‘Red Bull Ring Short Track’ circuits.

Read more

DiRT Rally 2.0 – VR Status Update

DiRT Rally 2.0 – VR Status Update

At the beginning of August, Codemasters released update V1.7 for their DiRT Rally 2.0 title which added the long-awaited VR support via the Oculus Store and Steam (OpenVR). While this was great news, allot of the DiRT fans were not overwhelmed by the quality and stability of the VR implementation.

Luckily, the development team is keeping track of all the tips/complaints by the community, and is already fixing and improving  VR support issues.

Read more

Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps Coming To Gran Turismo Sport

Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps Coming To Gran Turismo Sport

Gran Turismo Sport already contains a good number of popular circuits in its track portfolio, yet a famous, and one of the most requested tracks was still missing. Spa-Francorchamps which is arguably one of the most beautiful tracks in the world did not yet make it into GT sport due to some long-running licensing problems.

Read more

iRacing – 3 New NASCAR XFINITY Series Cars Coming In September

iRacing – 3 New NASCAR XFINITY Series Cars Coming In September

After introducing the Audi RS3 LMS TCR which will be the new vehicle of choice for the upcoming iRacing Michelin Pilot Challenge, the upcoming iRacing Season 4 build will also deploy 3 brand new NASCAR XFINITY Series cars. Introducing the XFINITY Ford Mustang, Toyota Supra, and Chevrolet Camaro.

The car models will be priced at $11.95. However, whoever purchased it’s predecessor, in the last 24 months, and in the case of the Toyota Supra, that is the Xfinity Camry, will be granted the cars for free. Furthermore, anybody else who purchased the predecessor, prior to the two years will receive $5 in credit.

Read more

Worlds Fastest Gamer 2019 – rFactor2 Entry Event

Worlds Fastest Gamer 2019 – rFactor2 Entry Event

Its time for the 2019 World’s Fastest Gamer competition, in which the winner will become a professional driver and race Aston Martins with R-Motorsport at iconic circuits such as Monza, Paul Ricard, Brands Hatch, Nurburgring, and in the Spa-Francorchamps and Daytona 24 hours.

Read more